FilmWeek: ‘Justice League,’ ‘The Star,’ ‘Wonder’ and more

Julia Roberts and Jacob Tremblay in WONDER.
Julia Roberts and Jacob Tremblay in WONDER. 

DALE ROBINETTE.

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Lael Loewenstein, Tim Cogshell, and Charles Solomon review this weekend’s new movie releases including:

  • Justice League” in wide release
  • The Star” in wide release
  • Wonder” in wide release
  • Mudbound” at Laemmle’s Monica Film Center, Laemmle’s NoHo, The Landmark and on Netflix
  • The Breadwinner” at the Nuart Theatre
  • Roman J. Israel, Esq.” at AMC Century City and ArcLight Hollywood
  • The Divine Order” at Laemmle’s Playhouse and Laemmle’s Royal
  • Wait For Your Laugh” at Laemmle’s Royal, Laemmle’s Town Center and The Egyptian (Saturday night’s showing at The Egyptian will be followed by a discussion with director Jason Wise, Dick van Dyke and Dan Harmon)

CRITICS’ HITS

Tim: “Mudbound” & “The Divine Order”

Lael: “The Breadwinner,” “Mudbound” & “The Divine Order”

Charles: “The Breadwinner”

MIXED FEELINGS

Tim: “Roman J. Israel, Esq.”

Lael: “Justice League” & “Wonder”

Charles: “Wait For Your Laugh”

 

MISSES!

Lael & Charles: “The Star”

 

GUESTS:

Lael Loewenstein, KPCC film critic

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC, Alt-Film Guide and CineGods.com; he tweets @CinemaInMind

Charles Solomon, film critic for KPCC, Animation Scoop and Animation Magazine

‘Trouble Is My Business’

Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell: Femme fatale in humorous homage to old film noirsBrittney Powell in Trouble Is My Business
Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston‘s The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles‘ Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the ’40s and ’50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey BogartRobert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane GreerLizabeth ScottLauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor.

‘Trouble Is My Business’: Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of ‘The Maltese Falcon’ & ‘Touch of Evil’

A crunchy, witty, and often just plain funny mash-up of classic noir tropes, from hard-boiled private dicks to the easy-on-the-eyes femme fatales – in addition to dialogue worthy of Dashiell Hammett and, occasionally, Mel Brooks – Trouble Is My Business means business, but it doesn’t mind having a good chuckle as it walks the dark and winding path of double-crosses, corruption, and death.

Directed by Tom Konkle, who also co-wrote and co-stars with Brittney Powell as the dick and the dame, Trouble Is My Business– no direct connection to Raymond Chandler’s 1939 Philip Marlowe short story – features Konkle as private eye Roland Drake, the quintessential representation of the 1940s noir detective – no pretty boy – with a visage having more in common with Robert Mitchum, who played Marlowe in the 1975 neo-noir Farewell My, Lovely, than Humphrey Bogart, who was Sam Spade in the movie about the black bird.

Neither of those guys were pretty boys either, which is why we bought them – and that’s why we buy Konkle as a forlorn detective taking the rap for the death of a girl he was supposed to save.

Brittney Powell is also a veteran actor whose credits include Brunhilda in Xena: Warrior Princess, among several auspicious roles in all manner of film and television. She’s very good as Jennifer Montemar, a part written by Powell herself so she could play the kind of woman she always wanted.

Jennifer has a good deal more humor than, say, Mary Astor’s desperate femme fatale in The Maltese Falcon. Yet Powell (eventually) gives the character even more of an edge than Jane Greer’s blond, man-eating girl-shark in Out of the Past.

Those movies and a number of others that only true aficionados of the genre will notice are referenced in Trouble Is My Business. For fans, catching little homages to Double Indemnity and Murder, My Sweet is lovely, but the film Trouble Is My Business circles most often is the great Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil.

Shades of Welles’ evil Police Captain Hank Quinlan show up in the character played by veteran actor Vernon Wells (The Road Warrior): Detective Barry Tate, a sadistic sociopath of a cop that Drake must eventually face – alongside his other demons.

Trouble Is My Business trailer.

The twists and turns of the plot in Trouble Is My Business are every bit as serpentine as those in most noir. I still don’t know what’s going on in The Maltese Falcon, and I’m not sure I know exactly what’s going on in this movie either – but as is the case with most noir, who cares? It’s the ride and the characters and the very tone itself – not the stories – that make noir…  noir.

To that end, the filmmakers here use another film noir trope: artifice. The film noirs of old were generally inexpensive productions; some were actually cheap. They usually faked everything from locations and lighting to the existence of walls and ceilings where there were none.

The use of darkness was not necessarily a stroke of filmmaking genius in the production of noir, it was at times a necessity because there was usually very little production design and often lots of stuff to hide. The leading man never changed clothes because the leading lady‘s wardrobe was more important.

Tragic Gay Star

Trouble Is My Business uses the artifice of props and costume and special effects to create 1940s Los Angeles exteriors and lush interiors all of which is slightly unreal, if not a little surreal. Orson Welles, himself a master of the unreal in a number of ways, would be most impressed.

Trouble Is My Business (2017)  Dir.: Tom Konkle. Scr.: Tom Konkle & Brittney Powell. Cast: Tom Konkle. Brittney Powell. Vernon Wells. David Beeler. Steve Tom. Ben Pace. Mark Teich. Doug Spearman. Jordana Capra. Benton Jennings. William Jackson. E. Sean Griffin.

Trouble Is My Business cast info via the IMDb.

Brittney Powell and Tom Konkle Trouble Is My Business trailer and image: Lumen Actus.

Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell: Femme fatale in humorous homage to old film noirsBrittney Powell in Trouble Is My Business

Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston‘s The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles‘ Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the ’40s and ’50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey BogartRobert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane GreerLizabeth ScottLauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor.

‘Trouble Is My Business’: Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of ‘The Maltese Falcon’ & ‘Touch of Evil’

A crunchy, witty, and often just plain funny mash-up of classic noir tropes, from hard-boiled private dicks to the easy-on-the-eyes femme fatales – in addition to dialogue worthy of Dashiell Hammett and, occasionally, Mel Brooks – Trouble Is My Business means business, but it doesn’t mind having a good chuckle as it walks the dark and winding path of double-crosses, corruption, and death.

Directed by Tom Konkle, who also co-wrote and co-stars with Brittney Powell as the dick and the dame, Trouble Is My Business– no direct connection to Raymond Chandler’s 1939 Philip Marlowe short story – features Konkle as private eye Roland Drake, the quintessential representation of the 1940s noir detective – no pretty boy – with a visage having more in common with Robert Mitchum, who played Marlowe in the 1975 neo-noir Farewell My, Lovely, than Humphrey Bogart, who was Sam Spade in the movie about the black bird.

Neither of those guys were pretty boys either, which is why we bought them – and that’s why we buy Konkle as a forlorn detective taking the rap for the death of a girl he was supposed to save.

Brittney Powell is also a veteran actor whose credits include Brunhilda in Xena: Warrior Princess, among several auspicious roles in all manner of film and television. She’s very good as Jennifer Montemar, a part written by Powell herself so she could play the kind of woman she always wanted.

Jennifer has a good deal more humor than, say, Mary Astor’s desperate femme fatale in The Maltese Falcon. Yet Powell (eventually) gives the character even more of an edge than Jane Greer’s blond, man-eating girl-shark in Out of the Past.

Those movies and a number of others that only true aficionados of the genre will notice are referenced in Trouble Is My Business. For fans, catching little homages to Double Indemnity and Murder, My Sweet is lovely, but the film Trouble Is My Business circles most often is the great Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil.

Shades of Welles’ evil Police Captain Hank Quinlan show up in the character played by veteran actor Vernon Wells (The Road Warrior): Detective Barry Tate, a sadistic sociopath of a cop that Drake must eventually face – alongside his other demons.

Trouble Is My Business trailer.

The twists and turns of the plot in Trouble Is My Business are every bit as serpentine as those in most noir. I still don’t know what’s going on in The Maltese Falcon, and I’m not sure I know exactly what’s going on in this movie either – but as is the case with most noir, who cares? It’s the ride and the characters and the very tone itself – not the stories – that make noir…  noir.

To that end, the filmmakers here use another film noir trope: artifice. The film noirs of old were generally inexpensive productions; some were actually cheap. They usually faked everything from locations and lighting to the existence of walls and ceilings where there were none.

The use of darkness was not necessarily a stroke of filmmaking genius in the production of noir, it was at times a necessity because there was usually very little production design and often lots of stuff to hide. The leading man never changed clothes because the leading lady‘s wardrobe was more important.

Tragic Gay Star

Trouble Is My Business uses the artifice of props and costume and special effects to create 1940s Los Angeles exteriors and lush interiors all of which is slightly unreal, if not a little surreal. Orson Welles, himself a master of the unreal in a number of ways, would be most impressed.

Trouble Is My Business (2017)  Dir.: Tom Konkle. Scr.: Tom Konkle & Brittney Powell. Cast: Tom Konkle. Brittney Powell. Vernon Wells. David Beeler. Steve Tom. Ben Pace. Mark Teich. Doug Spearman. Jordana Capra. Benton Jennings. William Jackson. E. Sean Griffin.

Trouble Is My Business cast info via the IMDb.

Brittney Powell and Tom Konkle Trouble Is My Business trailer and image: Lumen Actus.

FilmWeek: ‘Kingsman: The Golden Circle,’ ‘Battle of the Sexes’ and a tribute to Harry Dean Stanton…

FilmWeek for 

FilmWeek: ‘mother!’, ‘American Assassin,’ ‘Brad’s Status’ and a TIFF check-in

by FilmWeek

LISTEN HERE:  FilmWeek: ‘mother!’, ‘American Assassin,’ ‘Brad’s Status’ and a TIFF check-in

170766 full
Director Darren Aronofsky, actors Domhnall Gleeson and Jennifer Lawrence and producer Scott Franklin attend the UK Premiere of “mother!” at the Odeon Leicester Square.JOHN PHILLIPS/GETTY IMAGES FOR PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Amy Nicholson and Tim Cogshell review this weekend’s new movie releases including:

CORRECTION: During FilmWeek, Yance Ford, the director of the film “Strong Island” was identified as female. Ford is a transgender man. We regret the error.

Critics’ Hits

  • Amy: “mother!” & “Trophy”
  • Tim: “Brad’s Status” & “The Unknown Girl”

Mixed Feelings

  • Amy: “First They Killed My Father” & “Year By The Sea”
  • Tim: “First They Killed My Father” & “The Wilde Wedding”

Misses!

  • Amy: “American Assassin”

 

Guests:

Amy Nicholson, film critic for KPCC and host of The Canon; she tweets @TheAmyNicholson

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; he tweets @CinemaInMind

 

FilmWeek: ‘The Layover,’ ‘Unlocked’ and more, plus Quentin Tarantino joins FilmWeek’s ‘Jackie Brown’ 20th anniversary screening…

Listen here:  FilmWeek: ‘The Layover,’ ‘Unlocked’ and more, plus Quentin Tarantino joins FilmWeek’s ‘Jackie Brown’ 20th anniversary screening

September 1st, 2017, 11:04am

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Tim Cogshell and Christy Lemire review this weekend’s new movie releases. We also air Larry’s conversations with director Quentin Tarantino and actor Robert Forster on the film “Jackie Brown” from KPCC’s In Person screening event at the Theater at Ace Hotel.
Premiere Of DIRECTV And Vertical Entertainment's "The Layover" - Arrivals

Christopher Polk/Getty Images

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Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Tim Cogshell, Lael Lowenstein and Charles Solomon review this weekend’s new movie releases including:

Critics’ Hits

  • Lael: “Wind River,” “It’s Not Yet Dark” & “Step”
  • Charles: “Step”
  • Tim: “Some Freaks”

Mixed Feelings

  • Tim: “The Dark Tower”
  • Charles: “The Girl Without Hands”
  • Lael: “Some Freaks”

Misses!

  • Lael: “Kidnap”

Guests:

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; he tweets @CinemaInMind

Lael Loewenstein, KPCC film critic

Charles Solomon, film critic for KPCC, Animation Scoop and Animation Magazine

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Chief Zabu was written by Cohen and co-stars Norman – a veteran character actor who you’ve seen in films ranging from Ragtime and Romancing the Stone, to a number of Henry Jaglom productions, including Venice, Venice, Baby Fever and Irene in Time. Interestingly, Zack is also known as film producer Howard Zuker – with over 40 producer credits, including the 1974 Academy Award winning documentary Hearts and Minds.

Chief Zabu also stars the great character actors Allen Garfield, and Allan Arbus among a number of other 70’s and 80’s notables, from Ed Lauter and Shirley Stoler to former Mrs. America contestant and harpist Lucianne Buchanan.

I am not fucking with you – she’s hot and plays the harp.

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Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Tim Cogshell and Lael Lowenstein review this weekend’s new movie releases including:

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  • Lost in Paris” at Laemmle’s Playhouse and Laemmle’s Royal Theatre
  • Harmonium” at Laemmle’s Monica Film Center
  • Austin Found” at Laemmle’s Monica Film Center
  • Hickok” at Laemmle’s Music Hall

Critics’ Hits

  • Lael: “Spider-Man: Homecoming” & “Harmonium”
  • Tim: “A Ghost Story” & “Harmonium”

 

Mixed Feelings

  • Tim: “Lost in Paris”
  • Lael: “A Ghost Story”

 

Misses!

  • Lael: “Austin Found”
  • Tim: “Hickok”

 

Guests:

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; he tweets @CinemaInMind

Lael Loewenstein, KPCC film critic

FilmWeek: ‘The Mummy,’ ‘It Comes at Night,’ ‘Megan Leavey’ and more, plus a chat with film historian Leonard Maltin

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FilmWeek: ‘The Mummy,’ ‘It Comes at Night,’ ‘Megan Leavey’ and more, plus a chat with film historian Leonard Maltin

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Justin Chang and Tim Cogshell review this weekend’s new movie releases including:

Critics’ Hits

  • Justin: “It Comes at Night” & “Beatriz At Dinner”
  • Tim: “Letters from Baghdad,” “The Hero” & “It Comes at Night”

 

Mixed Feelings

  • Justin: “My Cousin Rachel” & “The Hero”
  • Tim: “Megan Leavey” & “Beatriz At Dinner”

 

Misses!

  • Justin & Tim: “The Mummy”

 

Guests:

Justin Chang, film critic for KPCC and the Los Angeles Times; he tweets @JustinCChang

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; he tweets @CinemaInMind

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  • Going in Style” in wide release
  • Smurfs: The Lost Village” in wide release
  • Colossal” at ArcLight Hollywood & The Landmark
  • Gifted” at ArcLight Pasadena, The Landmark, AMC Century City and other select theaters
  • Their Finest” ArcLight Hollywood and The Landmark
  • Salt and Fire” at Arena Cinelounge Sunset
  • Your Name” (English dub release) at ArcLight Sherman Oaks and Laemmle’s Monica Film Center
  • Cezanne and I” at Laemmle’s Playhouse, Laemmle’s Royal Theatre and Laemmle’s Town Center
  • Tickling Giants” at Laemmle’s Music Hall

Critics’ Hits

Tim: “Cezanne and I”

Peter: “Their Finest” & “Tickling Giants”

Charles: “Your Name”

 

Mixed Feelings

Tim: “Gifted”

Peter: “Colossal”

Charles: “Smurfs: The Lost Village”

 

Misses!

Tim: “Salt and Fire”

 

Guests:

Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; he tweets @CinemaInMind

Peter Rainer, film critic for KPCC and the Christian Science Monitor

Charles Solomon, film critic for KPCC, Animation Scoop and Animation Magazine