DIY Film Fest: Women I love, in 4 films I love, that need a little more love…

by Tim Cogshell | Off-Ramp

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Sharon Stone in “The Quick and the Dead”TRISTAR PICTURES

 

LISTEN HERE:  http://www.scpr.org/programs/offramp/2017/01/19/54508/tim-cogshell-s-diy-film-fest-women-i-love-in-4-fil/

I’m a sucker for girl talk movies, true love stories, and movies where a lady rides into the sunset after she shoots the bastard who killed her daddy – in the head. This DIY Film Festival is for films that I love, about women that I love, in movies that should have got a lot more love.

1. “Live Nude Girls” (1995)

“Live Nude Girls” was directed by Julianna Lavin, who directed this film, one episode of Party of Five in 1998, and nothing else.  This happens in Hollywood more often than you’d think, but it happens to female  filmmakers even more often than that. It stars Dana Delany, Laila Robins, Lora Zane, Cynthia Stevenson and, ironically, Kim Cattrall as the over or under sexed member of the foursome – depending on your point of view.

“Live Nude Girls” is a wonderfully funny and intimate movie about  four lifelong friends at an all night bachelorette party for one of them who is getting married for the 3rd time. This film is practically a blueprint for “Sex and the City” which started three years later. It’s frank and funny and sexy and filled with a female energy that reminded me of my very cool big sister and her amazing girlfriends, lounging in conversation, as I loitered near, always at the ready to fetch cigarettes and Fresca. It was the 70s.

2. “Living Out Loud” (1998)

“Living Out Loud,” directed by Richard LaGravenese, stars Holly Hunter, Danny DeVito, Queen Latifah and ecstasy – both the emotion and the drug. In the movie, Holly Hunter’s husband abandons her for a younger woman.

Sure, it’s a well worn premise, but it’s considered thru a wide range of emotions, spoken out loud, sung out loud, and even fantasized out loud. Hunter confronts her circumstances with philosophical introspection about the choices she’s made; with direct confrontation of those who’ve done her wrong … and with the occasional hit of ecstasy.

The highlight is this amazing dance sequence that I still find myself fantasizing about  from time to time. Occasionally, I’m even in it.

3. “Besieged” (1998)

“Besieged” is a Bernardo Bertolucci film starring Thandie Newton and David Thewlis. This is a love story about truest love.  Although, at first glance it might seem like a movie about stalker who plays the piano really well, David Thewlis portrays a man – a passionate composer and pianist – who falls in love with his African housekeeper on first sight. And why the hell wouldn’t he – she’s Thandie Newton – but his adoration is about much more than her beauty.

In her he sees pure intention, resilience, and a strength that his privileged existence could never know. Out of that comes a kind of love that leads him to  sell everything he owns, including his beloved grand piano, to give her the one thing she truly wants.

4. “The Quick and The Dead” (1995)

Last in my DIY film festival about women that I love, in films that I love, that need a little more love is “The Quick and The Dead.” This is Sam Raimi post-“Evil Dead” and pre-“Spiderman” directing a wicked Cowgirl movie. It stars Sharon Stone, Gene Hackman and Russell Crowe star alongside a young Leonardo DiCaprio, with Gary Sinise, Keith David, Lance Henriksen, Olivia Burnette, the great Pat Hingle, and the late Tobin Bell of the Saw films.

If you missed this wicked gunslinger revenge flick because you believed the middlin’ reviews from back in the day – you got suckered. It was accused of being too campy. Like that’s a thing.

In “The Quick and the Dead,” the Lady slaps leather with a bunch dastardly bastards, including the one that killed her daddy.  Like I said – I’m a sucker for girl talk movies, true love stories and movies where a lady rides into the sunset after she shoots the bastard who killed her daddy – in the head.

FilmWeek: ‘Underworld: Blood Wars,’ ‘Railroad Tigers,’ ‘Arsenal’ and…

by FilmWeek

Listen Here:  FilmWeek: ‘Underworld: Blood Wars,’ ‘Railroad Tigers’ and more, plus a new tome on the Marx brothers ….

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Actress Kate Beckinsale attends the Berlin to photocall for ‘Underworld: Blood Wars’ wearing a dress by Elie Saab on the terrace at Akademie der Kuenste on November 22, 2016 in Berlin, Germany.BRIAN DOWLING/GETTY IMAGES FOR SONY PICTURES

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Wade Major, Tim Cogshell and Charles Solomon review this weekend’s new movie releases including: in wide release, Kate Beckinsale taking another turn as vampire warrior Selene in “Underworld: Blood Wars;” Jackie Chan in the Mandarin-language feature “Railroad Tigers;” the thriller “Arsenal” starring Nicolas Cage and John Cusack; and more.

TGI-FilmWeek!

Tim’s Hits

Charles’ Hits

Mixed Reviews

This Week’s Misses

Guests:

Tim Cogshell, Film Critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; he tweets @CinemaInMind

Wade Major, Film Critic for KPCC and host for IGN’s DigiGods.com

Charles Solomon, Film Critic for KPCC and Animation Scoop and Animation Magazine

DIY Film Fest: Before they were bald

 

Listen Here: DIY Film Fest: Before they were bald

by Tim Cogshell | Off-Ramp

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I’ve been thinking about how some guys can do bald and some guys can’t.

In Hollywood, hair is a big deal. Can you imagine the late great Gene Wilder without those fuzzy curls or Brad Pitt minus those flowing blonde locks in Legends of the Fall? Bucking tradition, some actors not only survive after losing their hair, but excel.

Here are the totally arbitrary rules:

First – they must be now publicly and completely bald. Classic male pattern baldness and comb-overs don’t count. This lets out Burt Reynolds… John Travolta… Nick Cage… William Shatner… and many other actors known to be bald but who won’t cop to it in public.

They must have become or continued to be a movie star after becoming denuded – and last – their name must have occurred to me before I finished this piece. Okay… here we go.

1. Yul Brynner  

Brenner appeared in only one film with a full head of hair. In 1949’s Port of New York, Brynner played a debonair gang leader with fabulous dark wavy hair. He’s good. He didn’t need hair– even back then.

WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - DECEMBER 12: Actor Taye Diggs attends the 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Award Nominations at the Pacific Design Center on December 12, 2012 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA – DECEMBER 12: Actor Taye Diggs attends the 19th Annual Screen Actors Guild Award Nominations at the Pacific Design Center on December 12, 2012 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES

2. Taye Diggs

Nevertheless, you can see Taye Diggs with hair in a stint on The Guiding Light – 1997- where he played Adrian ‘Sugar’ Hill – a sexy business shark – with hair! He’s still got hair in the movie that launched him to movie stardom -1998’s How Stella Got Her Groove Back. He still needed a brush in The Wood – 1999 – but by 2000’s, The Way of the Gun – Taye was a handsome bald man, on-screen and off, and has been ever since.

3. Morris Chestnut

Morris Chestnut had hair from before Boyz N’ The Hood – 1990 – thru the 90’s, including that first Best Man – opposite Taye Diggs in 1999. It was the last time they’d have hair together. By 2002’s Half Past Dead, Chestnut had also gone clean shaven. By The Best Man Holiday in 2013, both Diggs and Chestnut had been bald for years and were bigger stars than ever.

4. Vin Diesel 

Vin can be seen pop-locking in an instructional dance video in the late 1980s with a serious head of hair. He still had a whisper of hair when he got his big break in Saving Private Ryan – 1995, and when he got first starring role in Pitch Black – in the year 2000. There was even still a shadow of his former fro in the first Fast and Furious film – 2001. It was as Xander in 2002’s Triple X that Vin was first a wholly bald badass.

5. Samuel L. Jackson 

Sam has lots of early movie credits with hair – dating back to 1972. You’ve seen him with hair in School Daze and Goodfellas and Jungle Fever and Jurassic Park. In 1998’s The Great White Hype, Samuel is wearing an interesting wig – it’s straight and frosted white – and perfect for this character – a shady boxing promoter a’la Don King.

Sam’s best hair is found in Unbreakable also at the turn of the millennium. It’s kind of Frederick Douglass meets Sugar Foot – the late front man for the Ohio Players – it’s stately – yet funky.

Sam appears in Unbreakable opposite our next pre-and-post hair movie star, Bruce Willis.

6. Bruce Willis

Bruce had a long career with hair – on Broadway and on TV – even before his hit series Moonlighting in the early 80s. He had hair thru the Die Hard movies, though, truth be told, it was always wispy. By Death Becomes Her in 1992, it’s getting very thin. For Pulp Fiction in 1994, his hair was thinner still. Then, finally, Bruce Willis goes boldly-bald in 1995’s Twelve Monkeys.

Both Bruce and Sam are avid movie-hair actors – which I love. Sam will rock a Pulp Fiction gerri-curl or a long straight Tina Turner ponytail like he did in Jackie Brown, if the role calls for it, while Bruce Willis has been known to wear any number of pieces to top off a character – so to speak.

So in a town as shallow as Hollywood what’s the thing that not only gets some actors past the loss of their hair – but catapults them to greater stardom? Here is my totally arbitrary answer: Some guys have bad heads for bald… and know it. Some guys have good heads for bald… but don’t know it. But some guys have good heads for being bald and do know it. For these guys hair is an accessory– fun but never really necessary.

FilmWeek: ‘Jackie,’ ‘Man Down,’ ‘Incarnate’ and more, plus a deeper look at capturing the life of Jackie Kennedy…

Listen Here: FilmWeek: ‘Jackie,’ ‘Man Down,’ ‘Incarnate’ and more, plus a deeper look at capturing the life of Jackie Kennedy

 

FilmWeek: ‘Fantastic Beasts,’ ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Red Turtle’ and more…

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Tim Cogshell, Andy Klein and Charles Solomon review this weekend’s new movie releases. It’s a big one for notable releases including the “Harry Potter” spinoff from J.K. Rowling, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them;” a critically acclaimed drama with Oscar buzz, “Manchester by the Sea;” a significant animated feature from Studio Ghibli, “The Red Turtle;” plus what Rotten Tomatoes calls more than just another coming-of-age dramedy, “The Edge of Seventeen;” a very promising documentary about an eccentric farmer, “Peter and the Farm” and more! TGI-FilmWeek!
BRITAIN-ENTERTAINMENT-FILM-CINEMA-FANTASTIC BEASTS

BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images

Is it time to retire the term ‘black film’?

by Austin Cross and A Martínez | Take Two

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Still from the film “Moonlight.”DAVID BORNFRIEND

For the past two weekends, two films with black directors and mostly black casts have garnered considerable attention.

LISTEN HERE: Is it time to retire the term ‘black film’?

Boo! A Madea Halloween” and “Moonlight,” a coming of age tale of a young African American finding his identity as a gay man.

Tyler Perry’s latest Madea film cost about $20 million to make and has already brought in more than $56 million.

Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight,” shot on a shoestring budget, has been almost universally praised by critics and has earned more than $1.5 million playing in just four theaters over the past two weeks.

These successes have led some to wonder if black film is entering into a new chapter, and if the title “black film” ought to be retired for the term: “film.”

For answers, Take Two’s A Martinez spoke to Filmweek contributor Tim Cogshell.

Highlights

BY CALLING A FILM A BLACK FILM, DOES THAT CONFINE IT?

You know, it depends. If we say ‘French film,’ we understand that we’re probably talking about a film that is in the French language, but we’re probably also talking about a film that references French culture. I could say ‘a French film,’ and it might be made by an Algerian or a Moroccan, and it will be in the French language but it will very much not be about the French culture.

I think that what we have to do is to allow the notion of black film to evolve just like we have every other genre of film: German film, Japanese film, all those films can carry those monikers, but they’re all just films. They’re all cinema.

WHAT IF THE MOVIE HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE BLACK EXPERIENCE? SAY A BLACK FILMMAKER IS HIRED TO DIRECT A FILM ABOUT UNICORNS AND RAINBOWS?

Then you’re going to have yourself a film about unicorns and rainbows that is a black film. It’s gonna be a black film about unicorns and rainbows. And by the way, if it were a woman directing that film, then it would be a film about unicorns and rainbows that’s very female.

SO THE IDENTITY WILL ALWAYS BE THERE. MOONLIGHT DIRECTOR BARRY JENKINS WAS ASKED WHETHER HE SAW HIMSELF AS A BLACK FILMMAKER OR JUST A FILMMAKER. HIS RESPONSE WAS THAT THERE’S NO TIME WHEN BLACK CEASES TO BE A DEFINING CHARACTERISTIC.

This is absolutely true. It’s true of us. Me, I’m a film critic, but I’m unequivocally a black film critic. My thoughts about film are filtered through my blackness because I’m black all day, every day.

ARE WE GOING TO START CLASSIFYING MOVIES DIFFERENTLY GOING FORWARD OR WILL THEY ALWAYS GO BACK TO THOSE LABELS?

You know, I think that they will always sort of go back to those same categories. What we need to expand is our understanding of what those categories mean. ‘Black film’ don’t necessarily mean Tyler Perry and Kevin Hart and “Boys in the Hood.” It can also mean Daughters of the Dust, wonderful Julie Dash’s movie. “Killer of Sheep,” by Charles Burnett. It might even mean a film that stars a white kid doing things in a white neighborhood that some black guy thought of.

Press the blue play button above to hear the full interview.

(Questions and answers have been edited for brevity and clarity.)

‘Loving’ inspires a DIY Film Festival of miscegenation films and shows you need to see…

by Tim Cogshell | Off-Ramp   

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You don’t need to wait for the local art house to put on a themed film festival. Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC’s Filmweek and Alt Film Guide, and who blogs at CinemaInMind, is producing a series of DIY Film Festivals for Off-Ramp listeners to throw in the comfort of their own homes.

WATCH HERE:

 

LISTEN HERE:  ‘Loving’ inspires a DIY Film Festival of miscegenation films and shows you need to see

This DIY film festival is about miscegenation. Don’t know or remember what it means? Good.

Miscegenation is sex or marriage between people of different races — usually whites and blacks. It was illegal in much of the U.S. until the 60s, and was also either taboo or forbidden in cinema. This DIY festival, including a documentary, a short silent film, and even a few TV episodes, is inspired by Jeff Nichols’ new film “Loving,” which is about the 1967 miscegenation case that changed the law and the movies.

1. “The Loving Story” 2011

“Loving” was inspired by the HBO documentary, “The Loving Story,” which is the first film of our festival. Mildred and Richard Loving were an interracial couple who married in 1958, despite Virginia’s anti-miscegenation laws.

 Richard and Mildred Loving in "The Loving Story," the 2011 documentary
Richard and Mildred Loving in “The Loving Story,” the 2011 documentaryTHE LOVING STORY

As good as the new narrative film is, the 2011 doc is better.

The Hays Code, the rules the movies were governed by, stated explicitly: “Miscegenation (sex-relationships between the white and black races) is forbidden.” When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Lovings, the 1930 Hays Code was replaced by the Classification and Rating System Administration. But before that, miscegenation was still fodder for Hollywood.

2. “What Happened in the Tunnel” (1903)

The earliest film to take on miscegenation may have been Edwin S. Porter’s very short 1903 film “What Happened in the Tunnel.”  It was considered funny in 1903, but the film probably contributed to the earliest rules on the miscegenation.

3. “Imitation of Life” (1934)

In the first “Imitation of Life,”  Fredi Washington plays Louise Beavers’ fair-skinned daughter who rejects her black heritage — and her mother — in favor of passing into the white world and landing a white husband. It barely made it past the censors, but today it’s in the National Film Registry, and Time called it one of “The 25 Most Important Films on Race.”

You might also want to check out Douglas Sirk’s 1959 “Imitation of Life,” which is still popular among African American women of a certain age.

4. “Pinky” (1949)

In “Pinky,” Jeanne Crain is a young woman who slips into passing as white almost by accident when she goes away to nursing school. She feels guilty, but yet so aware of what being white could mean to her life. Pinky doesn’t hate being black, she just wants what life being white could offer … including the white man who wants to marry her.

5. “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?” (1967)

Next on our list, Stanley Kramer’s “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” from 1967, in which a white girl falls in love with a black man, played by Sidney Poitier, and when the families meet for dinner, they hash it out earnestly. This film took a beating from the left and the right from the day it was released, as we saw in “The Butler,” when David Oyelowo’s young Black Panther disparages Sidney Poitier. It’s problematic for any number of reasons, but I defend its intention — fervently. Before the change in the movie code or the Loving decision, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” faced down the nations’ bigots.

6. “Movin’ with Nancy” (1967)

After the Loving case, the notion of miscegenation in film and television evolved. Soon we saw the first kiss on American prime time network TV when Kirk and Uhura kissed in a 1968 episode of “Star Trek.” The suits from the network resisted the interracial kiss — but the tepid peck made it to air and is said to be the first such kiss on network TV.

Or maybe it wasn’t:

The December 1967 episode of “Movin’ with Nancy” features a kiss between Nancy Sinatra and Sammy Davis, Jr. more than a year before that “Star Trek” episode. The easy, friendly kiss comes at the very end of the photo session scene. A few years later,  in February of 1972, Sammy would go on plant the kiss that sealed the deal for anti-miscegenation attitudes in America once and for all.

Sammy Davis, Jr. kisses Carrol O'Connor on "All in the Family"
Sammy Davis, Jr. kisses Carrol O’Connor on “All in the Family”CBS

When Sammy kisses Archie Bunker, it was effectively the first kiss between a Protestant-white-male-bigot and a black-male-converted-Jew on American television.

It was on the cheek, and in many ways is reminiscent of that original kiss in Edwin S. Porter’s short silent film. Only this time it’s not racist and is actually funny. It left the nation a little stunned and ended the issue of miscegenation in American media — forever — although the state of Alabama would not repeal its miscegenation laws until the year 2000.

Tim is Critic At Large for Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/blog).  His reviews are archived at:  http://www.rottentomatoes.com/critic/tim-cogshell/

FilmWeek: ‘Jack Reacher,’ ‘Ouija: Origin of Evil,’ ‘Moonlight’ and more, plus complaints about an insular culture at Netflix

FilmWeek: ‘Jack Reacher,’ ‘Ouija: Origin of Evil,’ ‘Moonlight’ and more…

by FilmWeek

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Tom Cruise attends the World Premiere of ‘Jack Reacher’ at Odeon Leicester Square on December 10, 2012 in London, England.TIM P. WHITBY/GETTY IMAGES

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Tim Cogshell, Charles Solomon and Peter Rainer review this week’s new releases including the promising Halloween flick, “Ouija: Origin of Evil;” Tom Cruise in the return of “Jack Reacher: Never Go Back;” the acclaimed indie “Moonlight” with Mahershala Ali; and more.

TGI-FilmWeek!

Tim’s Hits

Charles’ Hits

Peter’s Hits

Mixed Reviews

This Week’s Misses

Guests:

Peter Rainer, Film Critic for KPCC and the Christian Science Monitor

Charles Solomon, Film Critic for KPCC and Animation Scoop and Animation Magazine

Tim Cogshell, Film Critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; Tim tweets from @CinemaInMind

 

Tim is Critic At Large for Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/blog).  His reviews are archived at:  http://www.rottentomatoes.com/critic/tim-cogshell/

FilmWeek: ‘Deepwater Horizon,’ ‘Masterminds,’ the new Tim Burton, and more, plus a closer look at ‘Command and Control’

by FilmWeek

Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Andy Klein and Tim Cogshell review this week’s new movie releases including: the dramatic portrayal of the 2010 man-made disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, “Deepwater Horizon,” plus the new Tim Burton fantasy, “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children;” an action funny starring the biggest names in comedy these days including Kristen Wiig, Leslie Jones, and Zach Galifianakis; and more.

TGI-FilmWeek!

Tim’s Hits

Andy’s Hits

Mixed Reviews

This Week’s Misses

Guests:

Tim Cogshell, Film Critic for KPCC and Alt-Film Guide; Tim tweets from @CinemaInMind

Andy Klein, Film Critic for KPCC

DIY Film Fest: You know Jack Nicholson can act, but did you know he directed three films?

by Tim Cogshell | Off-Ramp

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You don’t have to wait for the NuArt or the American Cinematheque to throw a film festival. Make one of your own! Every few weeks, Tim Cogshell, film critic for KPCC’s Filmweek and Alt Film Guide, releases another in his series of DIY Film Festivals for Off-Ramp listeners to throw in the comfort of their homes.

Listen here: DIY Film Fest: the 3 movies Jack Nicholson directed are better at home

Jack Nicholson has over 70 credits as an actor. But — pop quiz – how many movies did he direct?

Nicholson has 12 acting Oscar nominations and three wins. He and Michael Caine are the only two actors to be nominated for an Academy Award in every decade from the 1960s to the 2000s. From Easy Rider in 1969 to About Schmidt in 2003. Jack’s acting rightly overshadows his directing efforts – of which there are three or four – if you count his un-credited work on Roger Corman’s “The Terror,” with Francis Ford Coppola, among others.

1. ‘Drive, He Said” (1971)

Nicholson’s solo directorial debut is the 1971 adaptation of Jeremy Larner’s novel, “Drive, He Said.” The title is from a Robert Creeley poem about human disconnection in an uncertain time. It perfectly suits the  subject of the movie: the unease of zeitgeist. It’s about a horny  college basketball star who has an affair with one of his professor’s wives, played by Karen Black. It touches on the social revolution and the still lingering sexual revolution, featuring a long single take sex scene between William Tepper and a dazzling Karen Black, which Nicholson says he filmed “contranudity,” with Black wearing a huge fur coat, so the stars look like two bears wrestling.

“Drive, He Said” premiered at Cannes to mixed reviews, with equally tepid reviews and box office upon it’s release, tho’ Roger Ebert called it “often brilliant” and Vincent Canby liked it greatly. The original score is extraordinary and was composed by David Shire, then married to Coppola’s sister, Talia.  I just watched the other day for the first time since 1990 and it’s still relevant – and even  better than I remembered.

2. “Goin’ South” (1978)

Jack directed his second film, “Goin’ South” in 1978. It’s an odd caper comedy set just after the Civil War. The plot is nuts – tho’ apparently based on something they actually did during those days when men were sparse because so many died in the war: men could be spared from hanging if they could find a woman to marry them.

The movie failed at the time and most critics give it faint praise today. But it’s what I call a “chuckle in every scene” funny.  You never really laugh out loud, but you never stop chuckling, because there’s something funny happening in every scene; including a good bit of slapstick. It’s a movie that actually plays better in an intimate setting – like in your own personal DIY film festival — when you clock every nutty expression Jack Nicholson, John Belushi, and Christopher Lloyd make,  and hear every very funny line of dialogue … of which there are many.

“Goin’ South” was meant to star Elliott Gould and Candice Bergen, with Mike Nichols directing. But, when another film Nicholson wanted to make fell through, Jack stepped in to direct and found himself drafted to star.  His best work on “Goin’ South” was his discovery of his leading lady, Mary Steenburgen, who was working as a receptionist. It was great call. In her second feature – “Melvin and Howard” – she won an Academy Award.

3. “The Two Jakes” (1990)

Jack Nicholson’s third directorial effort is the sequel to Roman Polanski’s 1974 neo-noir classic “Chinatown,” “The Two Jakes.” I really like this movie. It only has one problem, it was made 10 years too late – literally. Originally set for 1985, and meant to be the middle film of a trilogy, “The Two Jakes” had issues from the start.

“Chinatown’s” producer, Robert Evans,  wanted to play the “second” Jake, a role that went to Harvey Keitel. And “Chinatown’s” writer, Robert Towne, wanted to direct, and didn’t want Evans … in the picture. (Ha ha ha!) But it finally got made in 1990, with most everyone in their original role  and Jack Nicholson directing and reprising his role as Jake Gittes. But for the “The Two Jakes” it was too late. Once again, reviews were mixed, though Roger Ebert gave it 3.5 out of 4 stars and Vincent Canby called it “…an enjoyable if clunky movie.”

“The Two Jakes” polls  6 out of 10 on Rotten Tomatoes these days, and if in fact it turns out to be the last film Jack Nicholson directs, he can and should be proud of it, along with other directorial efforts, each are worthy additions to our DIY Film Festivals.

Tim is Critic At Large for Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/blog).  His reviews are archived at:  http://www.rottentomatoes.com/critic/tim-cogshell/